Florence Nightingale: The Making of an Icon

Florence Nightingale: The Making of an Icon

Mark Bostridge / Mar 30, 2020

Florence Nightingale The Making of an Icon The common soldier s savior the standard bearer of modern nursing a pioneering social reformer Florence Nightingale belongs to that select band of historical characters who are instantly recognizabl

  • Title: Florence Nightingale: The Making of an Icon
  • Author: Mark Bostridge
  • ISBN: 9780374156657
  • Page: 433
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The common soldier s savior, the standard bearer of modern nursing, a pioneering social reformer Florence Nightingale belongs to that select band of historical characters who are instantly recognizable Home schooled, bound for the life of an educated Victorian lady, Nightingale scandalized her family when she found her calling as a nurse, a thoroughly unsuitable professiThe common soldier s savior, the standard bearer of modern nursing, a pioneering social reformer Florence Nightingale belongs to that select band of historical characters who are instantly recognizable Home schooled, bound for the life of an educated Victorian lady, Nightingale scandalized her family when she found her calling as a nurse, a thoroughly unsuitable profession for a woman of her class As the Lady with the Lamp, ministering to the wounded and dying of the Crimean War, she offers an enduring image of sentimental appeal Few individuals in their own lifetime have reached the level of fame and adulation attained by Nightingale as a result of her efforts Fewer still have the power of continuing to inspire controversy in the way she does almost a century after her death In this remarkable book, the first major biography of Florence Nightingale in than fifty years, Mark Bostridge draws on a wealth of unpublished material, including previously unseen family papers, to throw new light on this extraordinary woman s life and character Disentangling elements of myth from the reality, Bostridge has written a vivid and immensely readable account of one of the most iconic figures in modern history.

    Florence Nightingale Biography Facts Britannicahttps britannica biography Florence Nightingale Florence Nightingale, byname Lady with the Lamp, born May , , Florence Italy died August , , London, England , British nurse, statistician, and social reformer who was the foundational philosopher of modern nursing Nightingale was put in charge of nursing British and allied soldiers in Turkey during the Crimean War. Florence Nightingale Quotes, Education Facts Biographyhttps biography scientist florence nightingale Feb , Florence Nightingale was a trailblazing figure in nursing who greatly affected th and th century policies around proper medical care. Florence Nightingale National Women s History Museumhttps womenshistory biographies florence nightingale Often called the Lady with the Lamp, Florence Nightingale was a caring nurse and a leader, but is best known for making hospitals a cleaner and safer place to be Learn at womenshistory.

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    About "Mark Bostridge"

      • Mark Bostridge

        Mark Bostridge Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Florence Nightingale: The Making of an Icon book, this is one of the most wanted Mark Bostridge author readers around the world.


    596 Comments

    1. At over 500 pages, I kept wanting to put this down but then another anecdote would pique my interest. The family tree helped keep track of the multiple personalities, and a timeline would have helped even more. The author is good at analyzing Nightingale's strengths and weaknesses, and how, as a woman, she used her tremendous knowledge and skills to navigate Victorian society and accomplish her goals of improving conditions for the sick all around the world.


    2. This exhaustive biography isexhausting.Nightingale is an interesting figure--basically canonized in her own lifetime for entirely the wrong reasons, she emerges much more complex when examined. The Victorians didn't know what to make of a lady with will and fortitude who was enthusiastic about getting her hands dirty caring for ailing lower classes and even more enthusiastic about organizing all the proper logistics for doing so. Nightingale didn't want to make the endless useless social calls p [...]


    3. A challenging read, but also rewarding. Florence was an extremely progressive woman for her time, and if she'd lived in the modern day she'd probably have ended up as a member of Parliament, and/or a math professor at Oxford. I loved the stories about her bond with her pet owl, Athena they made her seem very human and accessible. As an aside, she seemed to be a real-life version of "Dorothea" from "Middlemarch" - a genius who encountered a lot of obstacles and closed doors, simply because she wa [...]


    4. This is an amazingly thorough biography of Nightingale and also a nice unpacking of the Nightingale legend. I didn't realize until Bostridge's book how much I thought I knew about her was not at all based in fact. And I love that she was stubborn and determined and a little mean when it came to her causes. She cared about individual patients, but she knew that better regulations would save more lives.


    5. This gives quite comprehensive coverage of a well revered long living British heroine harking back to the 1800s. Florence was born 12 May 1820 and died 13 Aug 1910, aged 90, and what she did in between (and, at points, did not) is well documented here. She pioneered a nursing role for women for which she will well be remembered. She was particularly interested in the statistics of how people progressed and spent a lot of time analysing figures (she invented the pie chart - and, liking a circular [...]


    6. What I liked about it: Of course I had heard of Florence Nightingale, and even went to the museum at St Thomas' hospital the last time I was in London, but I didn't know much about her besides the whole Crimea debacle. For example, I didn't know that her family had made it extremely hard for her to pursue her profession or reforms, believing that her place was at home or with a husband and children. In fact, she moved out on her own because she was so tired of her mother and sister pestering her [...]


    7. Nightingale chafed at her daughter-at-home upper-class life and in her 30's eventually earned her parents' permission to work in an administrative position in an institution in London. With the outbreak of the war in the Crimea, a family friend suggested she go there to organize the hospital. She was there less than two years. The war zone was accessible to reporters and sketch artists, and, given that the generals were uninspiring (charge of the light brigade etc), Nightingale, who was effectiv [...]


    8. It was not an easy to read, but still a very good biography. I was very impressed by the amount of research that went into it. It took a while to get going, mainly because it took a long time for Florence herself to escape from her family's protective control. I already had a high opinion of Florence Nightingale, but it was confirmed and enhanced by this book. My favourite parts were when she had come back from the Crimean War, was very ill, but continued with her lobbying for health reform from [...]


    9. I started reading this book because I'm a nurse and very vaguely knew about Florence Nightingale's contribution to nursing training. I am normally a quick reader but this took me 4 weeks to read. It has a lot of details that I found dry but I really enjoyed seeing her views on nursing and comparing them to what is taught now. Because of the conflicting biographies that have been written in the past as detailed in the last chapter, I think I rate this book higher as it has done what it says in ch [...]


    10. A long and detailed biography of an amazing person. Nightingale (1820-1910) was the first to apply statistics to solve large-scale social problems, such as caring for sick civilians and wounded soldiers - as well as public sanitation throughout the British empire. She is also an interesting point in the development of modern feminist thinking.


    11. Don't be put off by the size of this book - this is very readable, fascinating look at Victorian England through the lens of Florence Nightengale. This book is very well-researched, lots of photos, and organized to emphasize the themes in FN's life. Of special interest is the role of women and how it evolved during the Victorian era, and FN's influence on its change.


    12. I was really interesting in reading this biography and it was well-researched and interesting but it was quite a laborious read. I am no stranger to reading books of 500+ pages but this one dragged a bit in sections.


    13. Interesting. I'm fascinated by mid-nineteenth-centurypeople who overcame so much and accomplished so much:Nightingale, Louisa May Alcott, Henry Carter, Audobon, Olmstead etc.Sometimes I like to think about an afternoon tea discussion with all of themtogether - okay, I'm a hopeless nerd.



    14. Enjoy this book thoroughly, very detailed and well presented research, a lot of interesting information that shows readers the real Florence Nightingale.




    15. This Biography is a long, slow tedious read, but I found it interesting and intriguing enough to motivate me to finish reading it.


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